Hello. We are considering a diy shipping kit, and have questions about the yolk test buffer. How is the yolk test buffer shipped before it is mixed with the sperm? Does it come frozen? I am going to have the ytb shipped to me (the one trying to get pregnant) and then take it to the donor (I am hoping to make this as simple for him as possible). What I'm trying to ask is, what condition does the ytb need to be in while I am transporting it to the donor? Does it need to be frozen, thawed, or otherwise? I understand that it needs to be cooled, not frozen, until I use it. Do I need to put it on dry ice, or are ice packs from my freezer sufficient? Thank you for reading my post.
Wednesday, January 30 2013, 03:15 PM
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Wednesday, January 30 2013, 03:31 PM - #Permalink
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TYB is sold frozen and needs to stay that way before use. Almost every recipient purchases it and has it shipped directly to the donor. It pretty much only gets used if you are planning on using shipping - it keeps a donation viable for 23-48 hrs when packaged correctly. If your donor is local, you don't need to use TYB.
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    Wednesday, January 30 2013, 05:57 PM - #Permalink
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    Test Yolk Buffer is stored frozen, transported to you with ice packs. If it is a bulk pack from Irvine Scientific (24 vials) they will send it in dry ice and it will not thaw. If either Irvine Scientific TYB (pale yellow) or the babydustdelivery TYB (white) is shipped to you in a shipper (1-5 vials), they will use a simple ice pack. During the shipment, the TYB will thaw a little and liquefy. Once you get it you can freeze it again. Some of their shipping documentation will tell you not to subject it to repeated freeze and thaw cycles, but I have contacted reps from both companies directly and both of them claim that 2-3 times will not create any harm.

    So when you get it, put it right in the freezer until it is time to use it. Then take it out and only thaw it the next time when you know you will use it immediately and you will be fine.

    Now, here is the million-dollar question: If you can drive to your donor, why do you even need TYB? My only thought is maybe one of the two of you are going on a trip and need to ship from the road. The reason I ask, is that it really is a waste of money to ship a short distance - fresh is much better and cheaper. Just curious.
    • hammerandanail9
      more than a month ago
      Thanks everyone for sharing your knowledge. I need the TYB because the only times this cycle that I can travel to meet up with my donor are just prior to and just after my fertile window. I would have the kit shipped to me because I feel like asking him to donate in the first place is enough to ask of him---I don't want him to have to shoulder the responsability of dealing with the TYB. I did talk to my ob today and she assured me that even if I am inseminating a little bit before my fertile time, I should be all right. I may not go ahead with the TYB, but I needed to find out all the details to make an informed decision. Thanks again for sharing what you know.
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    Wednesday, January 30 2013, 06:22 PM - #Permalink
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    the others already said, the TYB will come frozen. Best place to get it is from is www.babydustdelivery.com, they sell a pack of 5 tyb. This also comes over nighted to you in a insulated kit, which you can then reuse for shipping (though the kit is a little awkward to use, if you don't get the ice pack in just right it won't shut properly).

    I I want to address the implication that you would take it to the donor though. Shipping is not only expensive, it hurts sperm count and motility and thus your overall chance of success. I't always preferable to do live sperm to shipping if possible. If your donor is close enough to drive to you will likely want to travel to him instead of shipping, both for savings on cost (even a close donor is going to cost 60+ bucks) and to increase the odds of a quick success. Just to make it clear sperm lasts better inside of the women's body then chilled for shipping. Some women have mentioned trying to chill sperm to save for another day, but they would be more likely to have a success if they use all the sperm immediately rather then trying to 'store' some for the next day; due to the harm chilling does. I just wanted to mention that if it was something you were considering.

    There is allot of good information about shipping on the library here: http://www.knowndonorregistry.com/info-center/library/shipping-sperm_c228/. I happen to think the bottom link is the best, but I'm biased lol. Feel free to PM me if you had any specific questions about the process, I'm on most mid-to-late evenings.
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    Thursday, January 31 2013, 04:17 AM - #Permalink
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    You could also use NWCryobank for shipping kits.
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    Friday, February 01 2013, 04:57 AM - #Permalink
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    I need the TYB because the only times this cycle that I can travel to meet up with my donor are just prior to and just after my fertile window.


    One of the advantages of shipping is it's easy to schedule on short notice and there is no time off work. I would go with shipping and get the timing right over going early or late. But if you have to choose between early or late, choose early. After ovulation chances rapidly drop to zero. The egg is only viable for 12 hours or so after release. Bear in mind fertile window does not equal ovulation. You really need to track your ovulation and target either of the two days before ovulation to have the best chance of success.

    Rolranx is right. The environment of the oviducts is ideal for sperm survival. They can survive there much longer than they can survive chilled in TYB, which is made from egg yolks and sugars. They have been known to survive for five days in the oviducts, though, to be conservative, I would only count on two days.
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    raepetes
    raepetes
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    Monday, December 02 2013, 03:59 PM - #Permalink
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    I do want to ask, I'm thinking about using the shipping method, I heard that its best to get it washed, and you must use a physician and things like that. The whole reason we are doing home insemination because its affordable, We can afford to have ti washed and injected. So will the buffer really create problems if i inject it with the sperm to get pregnant? I understand it may involve some cramping, but will it really interfere with the outcome of getting pregnant or not?
    • A_Dad
      more than a month ago
      You mean like IUI or just regular insemination?
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    raepetes
    raepetes
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    Monday, December 02 2013, 04:35 PM - #Permalink
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    Regular since we not doing IUI.
    • A_Dad
      more than a month ago
      Well "washing" kills 95% of the sperm. Basically it's spun a 400 g forming a sperm pellet at the bottom of the test tube. The seminal fluid is poured off and the pellet is re-suspended in TYB. It's only needed for IUI because if seminal fluid enters the uterus some women cramp.

      Some women are allergic to egg yolks or something else in the TYB. You will have to try it and see.
    • A_Dad
      more than a month ago
      Normally seminal fluid does not enter the uterus. The sperm swim through the EWCM into they uterus.
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